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first_imgSpicers Potts Point.The conversion involved taking a trio of terrace houses dating back to 1873, and restoring and extending the property to suit a five star lifestyle.“Spicers Potts Point has been a delicate restoration-project for my team and I. Marrying the preservation of historical features of the property, with modern finishes and amenities throughout has been of utmost importance for this project and I believe the execution of this speaks for itself.”Mrs Turner said Potts Point was an iconic part of Sydney and the property was designed to add to the existing “buzz” of the area. Jude Turner, owner and operator of Spicers Retreats, at her new hotel in Potts Point. Picture: Hollie Adams.QUEENSLAND richlister Jude Turner – one half of the Turner couple of Flightcentre fame – has opened her dream project: the renovation of grand historic home cum five star hotel.Spicers Potts Point will bring to eight the number of luxury retreats she and husband Graham “Skroo” Turner have now, five of which are in Queensland and three in New South Wales.“We have long-dreamed of having an urban offering in Sydney to round-out our existing New South Wales retreats, and I’m pleased to officially open this to the public,” she said.Mrs Turner has invested millions rejuvenating and rebuilding the Potts Point residence, where prices start from $429 a night for a queen room. There are 20 luxury rooms in the boutique hotel.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoSpicers Potts Point starts from $429 a night for a Queen Room. Spicers Potts Point has 22 rooms.last_img read more

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first_imgINTRO: The 18·4 km priority section of experimental Superconducting Maglev guideway was formally opened on April 3, and the first levitation trials are due to take place next month. Murray Hughes reports from the Yamanashi test centreJAPANESE Minister of Transport Makoto Koga and Yoshiyuki Kasai, President of JR Central, took part in ceremonies on April 3 (inset right) marking the official opening of the 18·4 km priority section of the 42·8 km maglev test line near Otsuki in Yamanashi prefecture.The first levitation tests are due to get under way next month – levitation has not been possible until now because the lift forces using superconducting maglev technology are not strong enough to raise the train off the guideway until it is moving at around 200 km/h, and the train has not yet been authorised to reach this speed.When I visited the site on March 11 the three-car train was undergoing low-speed running trials using linear motor power – the three-phase coils forming the stator of the linear motor are installed in the sidewalls of the guideway, and speed is controlled by varying the frequency of the power passing through the coils.The test centre is located near Otsuki, where the maglev test guideway is carved through the hills and mountains not far from the Mt Fuji range. A viewing platform on the roof of the five-storey control centre overlooks the double track guideway opposite a substation, offering a panorama over the Ogatayama bridge where the guideway crosses the Chuo Expressway. A public viewing area is being completed in an adjacent building.General Manager of the Yamanashi maglev test centre Akio Seki said the principal objective of the project was to develop a form of transport capable of carrying large numbers of people between Tokyo and Osaka in 1h. To this end the Yamanashi test site has been built so that it can eventually form part of the proposed Chuo Shinkansen.Seki set out the detailed programme of trials to date. Although the train arrived in the depot located at the Tokyo end of the priority section in July 1995 (RG 10.95 p631), it was not until December 1996 that all the equipment had been assembled and checked ready for running tests to begin.Seki says that about 10 days were spent testing the vehicles in the depot, moving them short distances, and this was followed by ’adjustment tests’ on the guideway. For about two weeks the train was hauled on its retractable rubber-tyred wheels in unpowered mode on the guideway by a special maintenance tractor without the linear motor equipment being activated; this was then switched live and a similar period was spent testing in this mode. During this period the checks included correct detection of the train’s position by inductive loop and its speed. The cumulative running distance on March 10 was 979·8 km, and Seki said that the 1000 km mark would be passed on the day of my visit. The maximum speed achieved by that date was 104·4 km/h.Seki says three years of tests are planned. The first year will be devoted to ’basic running’. The initial test period will see the train run on rubber tyres at speeds that will increase to 150 to 200 km/h to achieve levitation. Once levitated, the gap between guideway and vehicle will be around 100mm, and the landing wheels and horizontal guide wheels will be retracted.The second year is designated for ’general function tests’. With a second train due to arrive in October, trials will include passing at high speed. The double track section near the Otsuki control centre has one track laid out for 550 km/h, and one where speed will not exceed 440 km/h. Asked why the speed was not identical, Seki informed me that it was to save costs.’Continuity tests’ with the trains running between adjacent guideway sections controlled by different substations will also be undertaken during this phase of the tests, and a series of safety trials will also be carried out.In the third year efforts will be concentrated on endurance running, and Seki says that many visitors will be invited to sample high-speed levitated travel.Assessment by committeeAt the end of the three-year period, an evaluation committee will assess the project and deliver a verdict by the end of JR Central’s 1999 financial year. Established by the Ministry of Transport in January this year, the committee is made up of MoT staff, academic experts in the fields of electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, specialists in bio-electromagnetics, railway experts, and the project team leaders. Seki said that it was important to test the key technologies: safety, braking, train protection and the train’s articulation. He mentioned that a major concern was to prevent the occurrence of ’quench’, or sudden loss of the magnetic field. He said that this had happened on the Miyazaki test track in 1987 with the MLU002 vehicle, and considerable efforts were being devoted to ensure that it could not happen on the Yamanashi track. ’We have moved from a test project to one that is designed for commercial service, so safety and reliability are more important.’Seki said that another target was to keep magnetic fields below 20 gauss, and for this reason a magnetic shield is provided between the interior panelling of the train and the main insulation material in the bodyshell. Fully enclosed gangways also incorporating magnetic shields will take passengers from the terminal to the vertically opening vehicle doors which will align with the gangways; there will be no open platforms at maglev stations.According to Seki, only if the 20 gauss minimum is achieved will the train be permitted to carry the public. When I boarded the train on March 11, I was advised to hand my credit cards to staff outside the guideway.Airline interiorThe air-conditioned interior is strongly reminiscent of an airliner, reflecting the use of aircraft technology to reduce weight. Window size (400mm deep by 300mm wide), folding over-seat luggage lockers and the 2+2 seating layout are comparable too; the seat pitch has been set at 880mm.Seat belts offered further evidence of aircraft practice. Seki said that the belts were fitted while confirmation of the train’s safe operation is being sought. Once established, the belts would be removed. On commercial maglev trains seat belts would not be required.There is no cab at the front of the train as the train control function is carried out from the ground. A small crew compartment is fitted behind the leading levitation bogie, and here it is possible to view the guideway ahead of the train on a monitor linked to a camera in the nose. There are communications links to the ground control centre, while various displays show the status of on-board equipment.Should the train encounter an obstruction on the guideway, special guards fitted in the nose will thrust aside small objects such as birds. Larger objects will cause crumpling of a buffer zone, so absorbing the shock of a collision.Further developmentOver the next few months Seki’s test engineers will be seeking methods of cutting the amount of heat generated in the cryostats, and making the refrigeration plant more reliable. The vehicles will be tested to check how successful the semi-monocoque design of aluminium alloys is in achieving low aerodynamic resistance and weight. Weight of an intermediate car body is just 2·6 tonnes compared with 6 tonnes for a Series 300 car. Fatigue testing of a full-size model of a bodyshell has already been carried out, and the test engineers will now seek to verify the results by checking the vehicles’ ability to withstand repeated variations in pressure as they run in and out of tunnels. Most of the priority test section, 16 km, is in tunnel, and 11·4 km is double track. When the rest of the trial section is built, there will be 24 km of double track, and 34·6 km in tunnel. An early decision is needed to build the remaining 25 km, but this will depend on the early results of trials on the priority section.Braking methodsThe on-board power supply, provided by a gas turbine on the first train, will be checked for reliability, and the different types of brake will be trialled to ensure that they can stop the train reliably from 500 km/h. Initial braking trials were under way on March 11 using the aerodynamic brakes that fold up from the roof above each bogie; there are three single panels and one twin panel forming a pair of ’ears’ at the Tokyo end of the train.Other forms of brake include a regenerative brake that reverses the current in the guideway coils and returns power to the supply company. A rheostatic guideway brake is provided by making the linear motor act as a generator, with kinetic energy being consumed in resistances. Finally, disc brakes of carbon resin and carbon fibre composites are fitted to the undercarriage wheels to bring the train to a standstill. Use of multiple layers of rubber to achieve high levels of heat resistance in the tyres is intended to ensure that the train can ’land’ safely at 550 km/h in an emergency. One bogie has been fitted with drive equipment that starts the wheels rotating before landing.When the second experimental train arrives on site in October, it will comprise four cars, one of which is a stretched design (Fig 1). It is designed to be reformed as a five-car set by taking the intermediate car from MLX-01. The ’aero-wedge’ and ’double-cusp’ noses are retained, but the ends are reversed so that aerodynamic trials of both shapes can be compared.Among equipment to be tested is a resiliently-mounted levitation bogie (Fig 2) that is intended to improve ride comfort. In addition to the air spring between body and bogie on MLX-01, it will incorporate another air spring between the bogie and the superconducting magnet. Also intended to raise the ride quality is an active suspension system.The principal innovation will be an inductive on-board power supply (Fig 3) to replace the gas turbine on MLX-01.InfrastructureThree types of guideway have been installed on the priority section: panel, beam and direct attachment. In the panel configuration the coils are attached at an on-site factory to concrete panels which are then installed in the guideway. The beam configuration has the coils attached in the factory to concrete beams that take the place of the sidewalls. With the direct-attachment method the coils are fixed to the sidewalls on site. The guideway coils are made of aluminium conductors insulated with plastic.There are also three types of pointwork. Developed from earlier installations on the Miyazaki test track, the hydraulic traverser turnout has a moving section 88·2m long. The diverging route can be taken at up to 70 km/h. The electric version has a 73m moving section, and maximum speed on the diverging route is 45 km/h.For depots and terminals a moving-sidewall turnout has been developed. Vehicles will be able to take the diverging route at 45 km/h on their landing wheels.None of the three types of turn-out should take longer than 20s to operate.Trains entering the Kuki tunnel on the priority section at over 500 km/h could generate a compression wave travelling at the speed of sound that may create a sonic boom at the other end of the bore. To decrease the pressure gradient of the compression wave and avoid a boom, a 100m long hood has been constructed at one end of the tunnel.Asked about costs, Seki said that the budget available for construction of the 42·8 km test track was ´300bn, but he was unable to say how much of this had been spent on building the priority test section.JR Central has paid for 94% of the cost of the infrastructure, with local government funding the other 6%. The cost of the vehicles, electrical converters, and control systems which need technical development, is shared by national government (25%), JR Central (35%), the Railway Technical Research Institute (30%) and local government (10%). Seki said that some costs have also been borne by industry. oCAPTION: MLX-01 crosses the Ogatayama bridge over the Chuo Expressway near OtsukiCAPTION: Top: ’Aero-wedge’ nose at the Tokyo end of MLX-01; General Manager of the Yamanashi maglev test site Akio Seki looks on from the viewing platform on the roof of the control centreInset: Murray Hughes and Akio Seki try out the seats in the Kofu end leading car of the MLX-01 trainCAPTION: Fig 1. Layout of JR Central’s second experimental maglev trainset includes a stretched intermediate car offering 70 seats; the standard length intermediate car would have 62 seats. Overall length will be 101·9mCAPTION: Above: Moving sidewall turnout developed for low-speed applications in depots and terminals with the vehicles running on their landing wheelsUpper and lower left: Electrically powered traverser switch permits trains to take the diverging route at 45 km/hCAPTION: Aerodynamic brakes being trialled outside the Otsuki test centreCAPTION: ’Double-cusp’ end of MLX-01; a camera is mounted in the small windowCAPTION: Two designs of boarding gangway are on test: ’extension type’ (left) and ’swinging-door type’ (right)CAPTION: Fig 2 (below). The second test train will have resiliently mounted bogies (right); the rigidly mounted bogie (left) is fitted on the first trainFig 3 (bottom). Inductive power collection on the second train. Current is induced in the upper part of the levitation guidance coil (1), and then passes to the lower portion (2). This produces a magnetic field in the on-board power collection coil (3)CAPTION: Section of guideway in tunnel; there would be numerous long tunnels on the Chuo Shinkansen where it passes through Japan’s Central mountain rangeDepot keeps the magnets coolThe depot at the Tokyo end of the priority section has two tracks, one able to accommodate five trains and the other four. Equipment is provided to support the trains so that the levitation bogies or tyres can be exchanged. Daily inspections will be carried out here.The depot houses the equipment to cool the helium needed for the trains’ superconducting magnets to a temperature of -269°C. When a train returns to the depot, evaporated helium gas is recovered, purified and reliquefied for storage or re-use. Facilities are also provided for storing liquid nitrogen, used as a supplementary coolant.Before a train leaves the depot, its superconducting magnets are precooled and filled with liquid helium. On-board refrigeration is also needed as the liquefied helium evaporates as heat is generated while the vehicle is running. The refrigeration capacity of the MLX-01 is 60% higher than that used on the MLU002N test vehicle on the Miyazaki test track. Liquid helium and liquid nitrogen tanks are fitted on top of the superconducting magnets.To maintain superconductivity as long as possible, the superconducting coils comprise ultra-fine multi-filament wires made of a niobium-titanium alloy embedded in a copper matrix; the wires are cooled in the liquid helium to -269°CTechnical dataMain technical data of JR Central’s MLX-01 Superconducting Maglev trainTrainNumber of cars 3Overall length mm 77600Number of levitation bogies 4Length of leading car mm 28000Length of intermediate car mm 21600Cross-sectional area m2 8·9Height, levitated mm 3280Height, on landing wheels mm 3320Levitation height mm 100Seats, Kofu end car 46Seats, Tokyo end car 30Twin seat width mm 1060Gangway width between seats mm 470Width mm 2900Weight, fully loaded tonnes Leading car 32 Intermediate car 20 Bodyshell, intermediate car 2·6GuidewayLength of priority section km 18·4Maximum grade % 4Minimum horizontal curve radius m 8000Minimum vertical curve radius m 37000Distance between guideway centres m 5·8Maximum cant 10°Internal tunnel height (double track) m 7·7Internal tunnel width (double track) m 12·6L’ouverture de la voie de guidage à sustentation magnétique présage deux ans d’essaisLe tronçon prioritaire de 18·4 km de la voie expérimentale à sustentation magnétique supraconductrice a été officiellement ouvert le 3 avril. Les premiers essais de sustentation commencent le mois prochain lorsque le train d’essai aura atteint la vitesse de 200 km/h nécessaire pour réaliser une sustentation suffisante. Avec un deuxième train qui doit arriver au centre d’essais dans la préfecture de Yamanashi, un programme d’essais intensif aura lieu pour démontrer que la construction d’une ligne à sustentation magnétique entre Tokyo et Osaka offrant un trajet d’une heure, est une proposition techniquement réalisableErlast_img read more

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first_imgEuropean pension funds have seen liabilities sky-rocket as a consequence of the low rates, and schemes that have hedged only small parts of the interest risk on their liabilities have suffered in particular.At the Netspar congress, Van Olphen declined to comment on the hedging policy of APG’s clients, including the €356bn civil service scheme ABP.ABP has hedged no more than 25% of its interest risk and lost 0.5% on this cover last year.“This discussion would be too simplistic and single-sided,” Van Olphen said, adding that “with the knowledge of hindsight, things are always easy”.He pointed out that the drawback of an interest hedge was that pension funds, when using interest swaps, must “park” a significant amount of assets with the counterparty as a security.“This also poses a system risk,” he said.Van Olphen said APG, in light of the coming changes to the Dutch pensions system, must improve its ability to adapt, as the pace of change was “increasing all the time”.“In the past, the sector had to absorb two changes over five years,” he said.“Nowadays, we see five major developments in a single year.” Gerard van Olphen, the new chief executive at Dutch asset manager APG, has said the low-interest-rate environment plaguing European pension funds is “structural” and will not go away any time soon.Speaking at a congress organised by think tank Netspar, he pointed out that low interest rates were the consequence not only of the European Central Bank’s (ECB) controversial quantitative-easing policy but also Europe’s generally ageing population and relatively low productivity.With his comments, Van Olphen takes a different view from that of his predecessor, Dick Sluimers, who resisted the introduction of market rates for discounting pension liabilities and argued that central banks were keeping interest rates artificially low.Van Olphen’s view is more aligned with that of Dutch financial regulator De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB); Klaas Knot, DNB president, recently argued that the low rates seen today were a function of low inflation, an ageing population and the slow growth of productivity.last_img read more

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first_imgMailOnline 3 October 2014The number of mentally-ill patients killed by euthanasia in Holland has trebled in the space of a year, new figures have revealed.In 2013, a total of 42 people with ‘severe psychiatric problems’ were killed by lethal injection compared to 14 in 2012 and 13 in 2011.The latest official figures also revealed a 15 per cent surge in the number of euthanasia deaths from 4,188 cases in 2012 to 4,829 cases last year.The incremental rise is consistent with a 13 per cent increase in 2012, an 18 per cent rise in 2011, 19 per cent in 2010 and 13 per cent in 2009.The rise is also likely to confirm the fears of Dutch regulator Theo Boer who told the Daily Mail that he expected to see euthanasia cases smash the 6,000 barrier in 2014.Overall, deaths by euthanasia, which officially account for three per cent of all deaths in the Netherlands, have increased by 151 per cent in just seven years.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2779624/Number-mentally-ill-patients-killed-euthanasia-Holland-trebles-year-doctors-warn-assisted-suicide-control.htmllast_img read more

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first_imgStuff co.nz 6 August 2020Family First Comment: An excellent commentary – from someone who is intimately involved in this issue….“The other day I phoned a patient to discuss the options for treatment of her cancer and she pleaded with me not to deny her treatment. “I know I may have terminal cancer and I am older but I have so much to live for; please allow me to have treatment,” she said. I reassured her that she would be given any treatment that was suitable for her. It got me thinking that it is easy for patients to feel that somehow, they are not as worthy as others to receive treatment.“OPINION: I am a doctor and I have worked with cancer patients for over 20 years. I love to just “roll my sleeves up” and do my job.I do not often speak in public forums or give my opinions on issues, but I am so concerned with the implications of the End of Life Choice Act that I feel the need to speak out and share my story.The other day I phoned a patient to discuss the options for treatment of her cancer and she pleaded with me not to deny her treatment. “I know I may have terminal cancer and I am older but I have so much to live for; please allow me to have treatment,” she said. I reassured her that she would be given any treatment that was suitable for her.It got me thinking that it is easy for patients to feel that somehow, they are not as worthy as others to receive treatment.One of the great privileges of my job is that I can care for those who in society’s eyes may be considered vulnerable. In my practice I care for patients with brain damage, elderly folk (96 is my record so far), prisoners, people with extreme learning difficulties, with severe mental illness and with hearing or visual impairment.Each of these patients is in addition receiving care for terminal conditions. Should the End of Life Choice Act become law, each of these patients may become open to subtle coercion to feel that requesting medically assisted dying would be ‘the right thing to do’ to avoid being a financial or physical burden to those who care for them.The Oregon Health Authority reports that 59 per cent of patients who requested assisted suicide in 2019 gave being a burden to their family as one of their reasons.Dr Melissa James is a radiation oncologist affiliated with the organisation Doctors say no.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/euthanasia-debate/122351691/euthanasia-referendum-an-oncologists-perspectiveKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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first_imgPORT ROYAL, Pa. – The Pennsylvania Sprint Series will make its fourth 2020 visit to Port Royal Speedway Saturday night, taking part in a program honoring the memory of a widely respected member of the Central Pennsylvania racing community. By Frank Buhrman The Tribute to Curt Hershey honors one of the area’s leading engine builders, who passed away earlier this year. More than a few Hershey motors will be racing this weekend at Port Royal.  For PASS teams, the tribute also means a purse increase and special awards. CG Racing En­gines has added to the race purse to make the winner’s share $444 (Hershey’s son Joey ran car no. 44 with PASS), with comparable increases throughout the field; last place will pay $222.  Additionally, CG Racing Engines has matched the $100 awarded by Penns Valley Meat Market for the Hard Charger Award, making that $200 total. Newlin Bar Service also has joined the trib­ute and will award a torsion bar cleaning tool to the highest finishing PASS car racing a Hershey engine. If that car wins, Newlin will add $44 to its purse.  With more than 40 cars preregistered for the PASS race, this will be one of the most hotly contest events of the season.  Gates will open at 4 p.m. Saturday, with racing set to begin at 7 p.m. Adult general admission is $20; this also is Salute to the Military Night, with active duty service members and veterans admit­ted free with military ID or DD-214 as proof of service. Student admission is $10, and pit passes are $30.last_img read more

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first_imgRelatedPosts Fulham keen on Lookman loan deal Ighalo: My best moment as ‘Red Devil’ EPL: Crystal Palace stun sloppy Man U Odion Ighalo has won Manchester United’s March Goal-of-the-Month award for his sparkling effort against LASK in the Europa League. The Nigerian’s driven shot opened the scoring against the Austrians, after some skilled ball juggling in the build-up, took home 32 per cent of the votes in the Manchester United Official App. Ighalo narrowly beat off fierce competition from Scott McTominay, whose memorable late goal against Manchester City received 26 per cent. Bruno Fernandes’s first strike from open play for the Reds, at Everton, finished third in the poll with 16 per cent. Of course, March was cut short due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, with the Reds’ games versus Tottenham Hotspur, LASK and Norwich City being postponed. The club said: “Although we’re sure United would have registered plenty of further goals should the month have continued as planned, it would have taken something special to beat Ighalo’s strike.”— Tags: Europa LeagueEvertonGoal of the MonthLASKManchester UnitedOdion Ighalolast_img read more

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first_imgArsenal will be hoping gruelling trips to Turkey or Ukraine do not lie in wait when the draw for the Champions League play-offs is made in Nyon on Friday. Arsenal – who ended last season with a superb 10-match unbeaten run to secure fourth place ahead of Tottenham – will be among the seeded clubs in the non-champions section, and so cannot face the likes of AC Milan, Schalke or Lyon. However, the prospect of facing up to Fenerbahce or Ukrainians Metalist Kharkiv – both of whom’s participation in the competition proper could yet be in doubt because of legal disputes – will be one manager Arsene Wenger wants to avoid most, especially if the second leg proves to be away in the same week as they host north London rivals Spurs. Real Sociedad, who finished fourth in La Liga, boast former Gunner Carlos Vela in their ranks and have spent some of their pre-season in England, drawing 1-1 at Norwich in midweek ahead of a friendly meeting with Southampton. PSV Eindhoven finished second in the last Dutch championship and would represent a more favourable opposition, as would Portuguese side Pacos de Ferreira, who have never qualified for the Champions League. Arsenal, though, have some pedigree in reaching the group stages via an all-or-nothing tie, as they battled past Udinese two seasons ago and swept aside the challenge of Celtic ahead of the 2009-2010 campaign. Nevertheless, Wenger will take nothing for granted and has no intention to leave anything to chance having fought so hard for the right to play among Europe’s elite clubs once again. He said: “Our immediate aim is to start well in the Premier League and to qualify for the Champions League group stage. “That is always a huge challenge, which demands a lot of energy, but we fought hard to be in this position last year, so we want to take the next step now.” With such a key fixture arriving so early, Wenger will be hoping his three England men – Jack Wilshere, Theo Walcott and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain – all come through next week’s friendly against Scotland unscathed, having been included in a 25-strong squad by Roy Hodgson. Arsenal – who did not win any of their two games at the Emirates Cup last weekend – are likely to take a near full-strength squad to Helsinki for Saturday’s friendly against Manchester City. Full-back Nacho Monreal is not expected to be involved as, along with captain Thomas Vermaelen, he continues his recovery from injury. Despite the ongoing Suarez saga, Wenger maintains Arsenal are determined to strengthen the squad ahead of the closing of the transfer window on September 2, with reports in Romania suggesting a free transfer deal for forward Ciprian Marica is close following his release by Schalke. Arsenal are also expected to further free up their wage bill with the sale of Ivory Coast forward Gervinho to Roma and Morocco striker Marouane Chamakh to newly-promoted Crystal Palace. The Gunners look set to be without any major signings registered in time for Monday’s deadline to feature in the two legs – the first of which will come just a few days after the start of the new Barclays Premier League campaign. They continue to track Liverpool’s wantaway striker Luis Suarez, who has again spoken of his desire to leave Anfield in an interview with the Spanish media. Press Associationlast_img read more

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first_img “The first meeting with (executive director) Les Reed was open and clear,” Koeman said. “I knew about Lambert, Lallana and Shaw but after that we said, ‘OK, we are not a selling club – we want to keep the rest of the good players and bring new players in’. “We will continue with the Southampton philosophy which means we like to bring in young players and to continue what they did last season. “They had a fantastic season last season and still we have ambition to go forward.” Earlier this week, Lovren expressed his anger that Southampton had not informed him of a bid from Liverpool. The centre-half was a key part of the Saints’ success last season under departed manager Mauricio Pochettino and he is due to return to the club on Sunday before the squad leave for a pre-season tour of Belgium. “I spoke to Dejan twice and he was very clear about his situation,” Koeman said. “I am the new manager I want to keep all the good players – I want to keep Dejan in the team because he is an important player in the team. Ronald Koeman insists Southampton will no longer be a selling club and has told wantaway defender Dejan Lovren he was wrong to make public his desire to leave the Saints. Rickie Lambert, Adam Lallana and Luke Shaw have already departed St Mary’s this summer and, at his unveiling as Saints boss on Friday, Koeman was pressed on other key players who have been linked with moves away. The former Barcelona defender is hopeful he will be able to keep Lovren, as well as midfielder Morgan Schneiderlin, insisting the club are determined to hold on to their prize assets from now on. “We have to do what the best is for the club. He has a contract, he has to come back this Sunday but I don’t know what will happen after this. “It’s football and there is a lot of movement but first of all we like to keep all that information in the club and not in the press. That was not a good thing of his side.” Koeman added: “I wasn’t happy with his comments in the press.That is not good for the club, for the rest of the players or for himself and we will speak about whether to fine him or not.” Schneiderlin has been on World Cup duty with France, who were knocked out by Germany in the quarter-finals last week. The defensive midfielder is due back at Southampton in a fortnight and Koeman is confident the 24-year-old will not be sold. “We don’t have any bids for Schneiderlin,” Koeman said. “He is a Southampton player and he will stay a Southampton player.” Koeman was less certain on the future of Dani Osvaldo, who has failed to return for pre-season. The troublesome striker was involved in an incident with team-mate Jose Fonte in training in January and spent the second half of last season on loan at Juventus. “Osvaldo has a contract,” Koeman said. “What happened last season I don’t know, it wasn’t my problem. I like to have a really good atmosphere in the team but he hasn’t been at Southampton when he was meant to be at Southampton. “We heard from his agent that he was ill – I haven’t spoken to him. “We will go to Belgium on Sunday and he will come back to train on his own because he is too late and then he will have to speak to the club.” Southampton’s big-money sales have bolstered the club’s transfer budget and Koeman has been assured he will be able to reinvest the money into the team. The Dutch boss has already signed attacking midfielder Dusan Tadic as a replacement for Lallana and a deal is close for striker Graziano Pelle, who he worked with at Feyenoord. “We are looking at the positions in the squad and we are happy we have Tadic as a new player,” Koeman said. “Lallana is a great player in this position and we had some other possibilities but Tadic is a great player, a player who scores and makes assists.” On Pelle, Koeman added: “A deal is close – it’s still not signed but it’s coming close. We hope this weekend to have him as the second new player of Southampton.” Press Associationlast_img read more