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first_img  26 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 18 June 2015 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Funding Ireland GSK (GlaxoSmithKline) has announced an awards scheme for Ireland which will provide funding for health and wellbeing work.This is the first year of the GSK Ireland IMPACT Awards, an expansion of the GSK IMPACT Awards in the UK and USA that have been running for 18 years.The awards are open to registered charities that are at least three years old, working in a health-related field in Ireland, with a total annual income between €20,000 and €1,000,000.Applicants do not need to present a new project and can spend the award money whatever way they wish. The Awards will grant aid up to five winners with €10,000 in unrestricted funding while up to five organisations will receive €1,000.GSK believe the awards will provide organisations with an important quality mark to use on websites, email signatures and stationery. Winners will also receive an opportunity to network and learn from other charitable organisations in Ireland.The deadline for applications is 5pm on Tuesday 30 June 2015. The GSK Ireland IMPACT winners will be presented with their awards at a ceremony in Dublin in October 2015.Application guidelines and application form are available from GSK Ireland.Image: cardiogram and fitness by Delices on Shutterstock.com GSK Ireland opens IMPACT Awards About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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first_img More Cool Stuff HerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFinding The Right Type Of Workout For You According AstrologyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 things only girls who live life to the maximum understandHerbeautyHerbeauty The Pasadena Symphony Association (PSA), which operates the Pasadena Symphony and POPS, has named Lora Unger its new Chief Executive Officer, effective November 1.Unger, who has been the organization’s General Manager and most recently Chief Operating Officer since 2009, succeeds Paul Jan Zdunek, who has accepted the position of Chief Capital Development Officer with Singpoli Capital Corporation in Pasadena.Unger was hired by Zdunek following his assumption of the CEO position in December 2008. Since then, the two have brought the PSA into world-class venues (including the acoustically superior Ambassador Auditorium, the Los Angeles County Arboretum and the beautiful All Saints Church) and hired music luminaries such as Michael Feinstein, Marvin Hamlisch, Music Director David Lockington and Principal Guest Conductor Nicholas McGegan, and audiences have responded with historic increases in ticket sales.“Given the enormous contributions to our success that Lora has made for us, we’re delighted to elevate her to the position of CEO, following thoughtful deliberation by the Board,” said Kay Kochenderfer, President of the PSA Board of Directors. “Over the past five years, we’ve seen a 20% increase in Classics Series ticket sales, an astonishing 200% increase in POPS sales, and an 85% subscription retention rate. Everybody else wants to know how we’ve done it.”Unger’s focus now is on even greater growth.“We’re now poised to move to the next phase of this great orchestra’s future,” Unger said, “which is fully realizing our potential in this community, both as an important arts pillar and a force in the community. I cannot imagine a more ideal time to assume this new role with the Pasadena Symphony and POPS. I’m grateful to the PSA Board of Directors for their trust and encouragement, and am ready to even more fully engage with the culturally vibrant community of Pasadena.”PSA’s GRAMMY-nominated Music Director David Lockington said he is “thrilled for Paul and absolutely delighted that Lora will be assuming the role of CEO of the Pasadena Symphony Association.” Lockington pointed out that he has “worked with Lora for over four years. She is visionary, smart and an astute strategist. Her style is a stimulating blend of seriousness and humor which makes for a creative working environment.”Unger, who is also a trained violist, holds a BA in Music with a Minor in Business Administration from the University of Louisville, and received her MA in Arts Administration from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and Cincinnati College of Business Administration. Previously she has worked with the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, as well as the Cincinnati, Modesto, and Jacksonville Symphony Orchestras in public relations, marketing and artistic operations. She was a League of American Orchestras’ Orchestra Management Fellow with residencies at the Aspen Music Festival, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and San Francisco Symphony. She is a member of the Association of California Symphony Orchestras and a presenter at their conferences.The Board of Directors of the Symphony expresses their great pleasure at Unger’s acceptance of the CEO position and their faith in her ability to lead the Association with vision, imagination and discipline.The Board wishes to acknowledge the remarkable accomplishments of Zdunek in leading the Symphony onto the path of success and hopes for his continued success in his new opportunity.About the Pasadena Symphony AssociationRecent Acclaim for the Pasadena Symphony and POPS“The Pasadena Symphony signals a new direction…teeming with vitality…dripping with opulent, sexy emotion.” Los Angeles Times.“…full of pulsating energy from first note to last… the strings were lushly resonant, the wind principals were at the top of their games, and the brass rang out with gleaming vigor.” –Pasadena Star News.Formed in 1928, the Pasadena Symphony and POPS is an ensemble of Hollywood’s most talented, sought after musicians. With extensive credits in the film, television, recording and orchestral industry, the artists of Pasadena Symphony and POPS are the most heard in the world.The Pasadena Symphony and POPS performs in two of the most extraordinary venues in the United States: Ambassador Auditorium, known as the Carnegie Hall of the West, and the luxuriant Los Angeles Arboretum & Botanic Garden. Internationally recognized, Grammy-nominated conductor, David Lockington, serves as the Pasadena Symphony Association’s Music Director, with performance-practice specialist Nicholas McGegan serving as Principal Guest Conductor. The multi-platinum-selling, two-time Emmy and five-time Grammy Award-nominated entertainer dubbed “The Ambassador of the Great American Songbook,” Michael Feinstein, is the Principal Pops Conductor, who succeeded Marvin Hamlisch in the newly created Marvin Hamlisch Chair.A hallmark of its robust education programs, the Pasadena Symphony Association has served the youth of the region for over five decades through the Pasadena Youth Symphony Orchestras (PYSO) comprised of five performing ensembles, with over 250 gifted 4th-12th grade students from more than 50 schools all over the Southern California region. The PYSO Symphony often performs on the popular television show GLEE.The PSA provides people from all walks of life with powerful access points to the world of symphonic music. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img News Feature Stories Pasadena Symphony Names Lora Unger New CEO From STAFF REPORTS Published on Friday, October 24, 2014 | 3:17 pm 10 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Subscribe Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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first_imgBE particularly careful when withdrawing cash from ATMs.That’s the message from Henry Street Garda Station, after a female had her money grabbed from her at the ATM machine outside the Bank of Ireland, Upper William Street, last Friday.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The lady had just withdrawn a sum of money from the machine when a hand came in around her and snatched it as it was being dispensed from the ATM.The hand was from another female, who is described as in her early 20s, with black curly shoulder length hair, about 5’6” in height and wearing a hoodie and tracksuit bottoms.Gardai warn those making withdrawals to be aware of what is going on around them.“Have a look over your shoulder before the money comes out, and even before the transaction takes place. Be sure nobody is hanging around watching your movements. If someone is up to no good, then go to another machine to get your cash. If you notice anything suspicious, contact the gardai”. WhatsApp Advertisement Email Previous articleWeekly crime updateNext articleAIL leagues reviews and previews January 31 admin NewsLocal News‘Keep a watchful eye at cash dispensers’-gardaiBy admin – January 30, 2009 613 center_img Print Twitter Facebook Linkedinlast_img read more

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first_imgDonal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Linkedin Print Advertisement LimerickNewsMIC & LIT Skills Programme for Post-Primary StudentsEmpowers Next Generation of EntrepreneursBy Meghann Scully – November 18, 2020 118 According to Kelly O’Brien, an award-winning innovator and entrepreneur who is also a researcher in LIT, “It was great to support these students as they developed their ability to formulate questions and carry out research.”Mark Culleton, COO and co-founder of iDyslex added, “It was a powerful week full of inspirational future business leaders.” WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twittercenter_img Facebook Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Previous articleCollins confirms increase to Repair and Leasing funding limitsNext articleStatement: UHL 60-Bed Block Phased Opening Meghann Scully WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads A skills programme for post-primary students, designed and developed by Mary Immaculate College (MIC) and Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT), recently brought together post-primary students and entrepreneurs in an effort to inspire students and enable them to build creative, innovative and entrepreneurial skills for life. Email EMPOWER, funded by the Higher Education Authority (HEA), is designed to support young innovators and entrepreneurs.While this year’s programme took place online, it didn’t lessen its impact with one of the facilitators, Allen Wixted, founder and CEO of NoPlaceLike, and winner of the Limerick Best Young Entrepreneur in 2019, commenting, “Even in this virtual environment we managed to capture this high level of energy where everyone was inspired to work on something that could have a real impact.”Now in its fourth year, almost forty students from Limerick, Clare, Cork, Tipperary, Laois and Offaly participated in this year’s event.Over four days entrepreneurs and innovators including Allen Wixted of NoPlaceLike, Kelly O’Brien of CDK, Emily Duffy inventor of the Duffily Bag, Barry Fitzgerald of BWScience, Stephen McGarvey from FoodConnect and Mark Culleton of iDyslexic, shared their entrepreneurial journeys with the students, as well as supporting them throughout the week as they worked on some of the most pressing challenges society is facing today, such as those climate change, mental health and the impact that isolation and COVID has had on society.According to Patricia O’Sullivan, Enterprise and Community Engagement Manager at MIC, “We need our future population to be able to apply skills within and across disciplines and in real life situations.“Therefore, it is of critical importance that both formal and informal educational experience at all levels are innovative, relevant and prepare students with real world skills that are transferrable to the workplace. Empower was a fantastic experience for all involved.”One of the students who participated in the programme said, “Empower has helped me so much in terms of improving my teamwork, creativity and presentation skills, which will be really beneficial for my project in the BT Young Scientist competition this year.”During the four-day programme, students formed teams of six to compete for the titles of ‘Overall Winner’, ‘Best Innovation’ and ‘Most Creative Pitch’.Lucy Flaherty from Desmond College in Co. Limerick; Ali Ryan from John the Baptist Community School, Co. Limerick; Ava Carroll from Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ, Limerick city; Claire Hendy from Sacred Heart School in Tullamore, Co Offaly; and Muireann Duffy from Loreto Clonmel in Co. Tipperary scooped the title of ‘Overall Winner’.Blending technology, science and an understanding of eating disorders, they created a device called ‘Bounce Back’, an AI driven wearable device designed to help tackle the challenges vulnerable people face during times of stress when the risk of relapse can occur.The title of ‘Best Innovation’ was awarded to Aisling Cahill and Claudia Lynch from Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ, Limerick city; Alexandr Arbuzov from Coláiste Mhichíl (CBS), Limerick city; Ayushi Mahajan from Christ King Girls’ Secondary School in Cork city; and Julia Wiechcinska and Rebecca Inayat from Coláiste Muire in Ennis, Co. Clare.Their innovation was based around taking UV and UV-C sterilization, a technology currently only accessible in industry and scaling it down so that we can all use it to sterilize our environments each day.The team designed a key ring version of the tool which would beam sterilising ultraviolet light (specifically the UV-C wavelengths) on a surface destroying all viruses and bacteria on it.Their device was designed to make sure this is safe also for the user. This could be used in school or any environment to sterilize door handles, tables and staircase banisters for example helping to reduce the spread of COVID19.Aisling Clohessy from Coláiste Muire in Ennis, Co. Clare; Anna Graham, Emma Dineen and Eva Mullen from Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ, Limerick city; and Tommy Rice from Villers School in Limerick city took the title for ‘Most Creative Pitch’.They developed the concept for an app titled ‘Well Nest’, which aims to address the issues of anxiety and isolation amongst young people. Through embracing nature, users of the app can grow their own personal wellness tree, as well as access support tools and a like-minded community of other young people.Gillian Barry, Head of Innovation and Enterprise at LIT, said, “Most startups fail because they do not meet a market need. We believe that quality of the solution you generate is in direct proportion to your ability to identify the problem you hope to solve. This is key to impactful innovation and was a core focus during the week.”Adding “It was fantastic to see teams, who for the most part did not know each other beforehand, forming and bonding throughout the week with many of them planning to continue to develop their ideas together.“Their enquiring minds and ability to question the norm was inspiring and we were delighted to see so many strong ideas forming during the week.” Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

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first_img Twitter Elda Molinar helps 2-year-old Faith Ako to paint her box. Kids at the Odessa Day Nursery make Valentine boxes during the arts and crafts time. Odessa Day Nursery is one of the agencies helped by the United Way. Home Local News United Way raising funds for local agencies Facebook WhatsApp Less money being raised by United Way means funding cuts for their partner agencies. Herrick said during the 2015-2016 fundraising they had to cut the amount of money they could provide to their agencies by 30 percent, which he said reduces the amount of aid they can give to the community.A variety of agencies receive funding from United Way of Odessa, including the Permian Basin Mission Center, the Salvation Army, Meals on Wheels, and Odessa Day Nursery which helps low-income families by providing them with scholarships for their children. But without the funding from United Way, Odessa Day Nursery Director Dian Gouard said they wouldn’t be able to provide those scholarships.“We try to keep our fees at a low cost for them, and that way, the money United Way gives us covers their tuition,” Gouard said.The money from United Way also helps Odessa Day Nursery to buy things like art supplies and puzzles for the children they take care of.Herrick added that that United Way not only raises the money for these agencies, they also vet the agencies. Every year, panelists made up of community volunteers and members of United Way’s board of directors visit the agencies to look at their budgets, their overhead, and determine if they are meeting their goals of how many people they are helping in the community.Every year, any agency can apply, and partner agencies have to reapply, for United Way funding. Herrick said there are three qualifications to be able to apply: The agency has to be a 501(c) nonprofit, they need to have an annual audit, and they need to have a localized board for governance and oversight.Despite lower amounts of funds raised in previous years, Herrick said they expect to have a better fundraising campaign at least by next year.“In nonprofit business, you always kind of lag a year behind,” he said. “Next year, chances are we’ll have a great campaign, because people will have a year-and-a-half, two years of a good economy.”Herrick also acknowledged that as the economy recovers, there will still be population segments that need help, and will continue to need help.Anyone who wishes to donate to United Way of Odessa can do so by visiting unitedwayofodessa.org, or they can donate over the phone by calling their office at 432-332-0941. United Way will be accepting donations until Feb. 15.“We just want to thank the community of Odessa for the generosity,” Herrick said. “And if they could look within their hearts to help us get from $1.8 million to $2 million, we would certainly appreciate it.” Twitter Facebook 1 of 5 ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’ 2-year-old Arianna Renteria paints red hearts on her box. Kids at the Odessa Day Nursery make Valentine boxes during the arts and crafts time. Odessa Day Nursery is one of the agencies helped by the United Way. Previous articlePBAA to host Valentine’s interactive theater fundraiserNext articleELAM: Market tops display similar signs admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Local News United Way raising funds for local agencies Donate HereWith just one week left in their fundraising campaign, United Way of Odessa is working hard to reach their $2 million goal to ensure they have the money to provide to the local agencies they help support.Since they began their campaign last August, United Way of Odessa Executive Director Hank Herrick said they have collected $1.8 million so far, about $200,000 short of how much they would like to reach.The money raised by United Way goes to the 22 local partner agencies they provide to supplement their budgets, which means less time spent by those agencies will have to be spent raising donations for themselves.“We raise money in the community to give back to the community,” Herrick said. “The more money we’re giving them, the less they have to fundraise, and the more they can do what they were designed to do, and that’s help people.” Pinterest From left, Diana Ako and Aryalli Gonzales, both 2-years-old, paint their boxes. Kids at the Odessa Day Nursery make Valentine boxes during the arts and crafts time. Odessa Day Nursery is one of the agencies helped by the United Way. Pinterest From top, Diana Ako, Aryalli Gonzales, and Arianna Renteria, all 2 years old, paint their boxes. Kids at the Odessa Day Nursery make Valentine boxes during the arts and crafts time. Odessa Day Nursery is one of the agencies helped by the United Way. OC employee of the year always learning WhatsApp By admin – February 8, 2018 2-year-old Arianna Renteria paints red hearts on her box. Kids at the Odessa Day Nursery make Valentine boxes during the arts and crafts time. Odessa Day Nursery is one of the agencies helped by the United Way. 2-year-old Arianna Renteria paints red hearts on her box. Kids at the Odessa Day Nursery make Valentine boxes during the arts and crafts time. Odessa Day Nursery is one of the agencies helped by the United Way. 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School Hawaiian Roll Ham SlidersVirgin Coco MojitoFruit Salad to Die ForPowered By 10 Sec Croissant Breakfast Sandwich Casserole NextStay last_img read more

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first_imgTop StoriesBreaking- “Seems Good Order”: Supreme Court Refuses To Interfere With Allahabad HC’s Order Dropping NSA Charges Against Dr Kafeel Khan LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK17 Dec 2020 12:00 AMShare This – xA Supreme Court Bench headed by Chief Justice Bobde on Thursday refused to interfere with Allahabad High Court Order which quashed the detention of Dr.Kafeel Khan under the National Security Act (NSA).”It seems to be a good order by High Court…We see no reason to interfere with the High Court order,” CJI SA Bobde remarked.He however clarified that the observations in the High Court order…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginA Supreme Court Bench headed by Chief Justice Bobde on Thursday refused to interfere with Allahabad High Court Order which quashed the detention of Dr.Kafeel Khan under the National Security Act (NSA).”It seems to be a good order by High Court…We see no reason to interfere with the High Court order,” CJI SA Bobde remarked.He however clarified that the observations in the High Court order shall not affect the prosecution on criminal cases.The CJI denied Senior Advocate Indira Jaising’s request to expunge the above observation that the judgment will not impact criminal prosecution.He said, “the criminal cases will be decided on their own merits. The observations in a preventive detention judgment cannot impact criminal prosecution.”The UP Government had moved the Top Court, stating that in the impugned order, the Allahabad High Court had “substituted its subjective satisfaction” in place of the authorities view.The Uttar Pradesh Government has filed a special leave petition in the Supreme Court against the September 1 judgment of the Allahabad High Court which quashed the detention of Dr.Kafeel Khan under the National Security Act (NSA).The petition State of UP and others v Nuzhat Parween(mother of Dr Khan), filed on October 26, is likely to be listed before the Supreme Court on December 17, as per information available from the official website.UP Government’s plea against Dr.Kafeel Khan’s release was filed on October 26 and is likely to be listed before the Supreme Court on December [email protected] @UPGovt #KafeelKhan pic.twitter.com/VJQYxXi26l— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) December 12, 2020 A Gorakhpur-based lecturer, Dr. Kafeel Khan was arrested from Mumbai in January 2020, over a speech given on December 13 at the Aligarh Muslim University against the Citizenship Amendment Act 2019. The Pediatrics professor was subsequently slapped with charge under stringent National Security Act, 1980 for “disturbing public order in the city and creating an atmosphere of fear and insecurity within the citizens of Aligarh”. A habeas corpus petition moved by Khan’s mother, Nuzhat Perween, was first listed before the Allahabad High Court on June 1, 2020 after the Supreme Court refused to intervene in the matter, stating that High Court is a more “appropriate forum”. On September 1, 2020, the High Court allowed the habeas petition with directions to effect immediate release of Dr Khan.On a perusal of the record maintained under NSA, the Allahabad High Court concluded that there were no grounds to either detain Khan, let alone to extend such detention twice, as a complete reading of his speech indicated that he ‘deprecated any kind of violence’.The Court noted that the speech actually gave a “call for national integrity and unity”. The judgment completely reproduced the speech given by Khan, which was termed “provocative” by the District Magistrate.”The speaker was certainly opposing the policies of the government and while doing so certain illustration are given by him, but that no where reflects the eventualities demanding detention. A complete reading of the speech primafacie does not disclose any effort to promote hatred or violence. It also no where threatens peace and tranquility of the city of Aligarh. The address gives a call for national integrity and unity among the citizens. The speech also deprecates any kind of violence. It appears that the District Magistrate had selective reading and selective mention for few phrases from the speech ignoring its true intent,” the Bench said in its strongly worded Judgment.The judgment delivered by a bench of Chief Justice Govind Mathur and Justice Saumitra Dayal Singh held that the speech is not such that a reasonable man could have arrive at a conclusion as the inference drawn by the District Magistrate, Aligarh, who passed the detention order against Dr. Khan in February this year.Accordingly, it has revoked the NSA charges against Dr. Khan; the order of detention dated 13th February, 2020 passed by District Magistrate, Aligarh under the NSA Act and confirmed by the State of Uttar Pradesh has been set aside. The extension of the period of detention of detenue Dr. Kafeel Khan is also declared illegal.The HC observed that State failed to discharge its burden to establish that KafeelKhan’s December speech had “such a deleterious effect on the public order in district-Aligarh as had continued to exist up to 13.02.2020 necessitating preventive detention of the detenue”.Following the High Court order, Dr. Khan was released from Mathura jail on September 2, amid much fanfare.Pictures of Dr. Kafeel Khan after his release from Mathura jail following the Allahabad HC order quashing his detention under National Security Act. @Saurabhsherry#drkafeelkhan #kafeel_khan https://t.co/AFtJxhHeHd pic.twitter.com/IzJ71ZEmiz— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) September 1, 2020 Khan came in news first in August 2017, during the tragedy in Baba Raghav Das(BRD) Medical College Hospital, Gorakhpur, regarding the death of nearly 60 infants due to lack of oxygen supply. He was initially reported to have acted as a saviour by promptly acting to arrange emergency oxygen supply by paying out of his pocket. Despite being hailed as a hero for arranging cylinders as children gasped for breath, he was named in an FIR registered under Sections 409 (criminal breach of trust by public servant, or by banker, merchant or agent), 308 (attempt to commit culpable homicide) and 120-B (criminal conspiracy) of the Indian Penal Code. It was alleged that he was negligent in his duties, which resulted in a shortage of medical oxygen. He was arrested in September 2017, and was released only in April 2018 when the High Court allowed his bail application after observing that there existed no material on record to establish charges of medical negligence against Dr. Khan individually. He was also suspended from service alleging dereliction of duty. A report of the departmental enquiry absolved him of charges in September 2019.Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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first_img Google+ Motorist caught drug driving in Donegal Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Previous articlePeople may be required to wear masks shortlyNext articleTaoiseach hopes to lift some restrictions on May 5th News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic center_img Pinterest A motorist has been arrested in Donegal for drug driving after being stopped by Gardai conducting a Covid-19 checkpoint.The driver was arrested by the Buncrana Roads Policing Unit on Monday night having tested positive for the presence of cannabis following a roadside drug test.It’s after Gardai yesterday reported an increase in the number of arrests for drink and drug driving in Donegal. Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – April 22, 2020 Homepage BannerNews Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Twitter Google+ Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme last_img read more

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first_imgOvidiu Dugulan/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, EMILY SHAPIRO and MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 738,000 people worldwide.Over 20 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than five million diagnosed cases and at least 164,502 deaths. Here’s how the news developed on Tuesday. All times Eastern:9:53 p.m.: Government partners with Moderna to produce 100M vaccine dosesThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Department of Defense announced that they have made an agreement with Moderna to manufacture and deliver 100 million doses of the company’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate.Under the deal, worth up to $1.525 billion, Moderna will manufacture the vaccine doses while clinical trials are underway. The federal government will own the vaccine doses. If authorized by the Food and Drug Administration and used in a COVID-19 vaccination campaign, they will be available to Americans at no cost, though health care professionals could charge for administering them.As part of the deal, the U.S. government has the option to purchase up to an 400 million additional doses. Moderna is developing the vaccine, which began its Phase 3 clinical trial on July 27, in collaboration with the government.“Never before has a vaccine in the developed world have gone from Phase 1 to Phase 3 as quickly as the Moderna vaccine,” HHS Secretary Alex Azar said in a call with reporters Tuesday night.The Trump administration has similar agreements in place with five other vaccine developers: Pfizer, Novavax, Oxford/AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, and Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline.6:47 p.m.: CDC issues guidance on dealing with ‘mask bullying’The CDC has released new guidance for K-12 schools on face masks, including having a plan in place to address bullying and angry parents.“Stigma, discrimination, or bullying may arise due to wearing or not wearing a cloth face covering,” the CDC states. “Schools should have a plan to prevent and address harmful or inappropriate behavior.”The CDC also notes that since not all families may agree with mask policies, “schools should have a plan to address challenges that may arise and refer parents, caregivers, and guardians to CDC’s guidance on cloth face coverings.”The CDC recommends that people ages 2 and up who do not have trouble breathing should wear cloth face coverings in public settings and when around those outside their household, as part of mitigation measures to help slow the spread of COVID-19.In its new school guidance, the CDC also suggests that schools remind parents and staff to avoid touching the outside of the mask, and to wash their hands after they do. It also recommends adding cloth face coverings to “back to school” shopping lists.4:30 p.m.: Pac-12, Big Ten postpone all sports including footballThe Pac-12 Conference is postponing all sports through the end of 2020 due to the pandemic.“Unlike professional sports, college sports cannot operate in a bubble,” Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said in a statement. “Our athletic programs are a part of broader campuses in communities where in many cases the prevalence of COVID-19 is significant. We will continue to monitor the situation and when conditions change we will be ready to explore all options to play the impacted sports in the new calendar year.”The Big Ten Conference said earlier Tuesday that it too is postponing the football season as well as all other fall sports.“As time progressed and after hours of discussion with our Big Ten Task Force for Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee, it became abundantly clear that there was too much uncertainty regarding potential medical risks to allow our student-athletes to compete,” Big Ten Commissioner Kevin Warren said in a statement.4:20 p.m.: Over 800 students quarantined in Georgia school districtGeorgia’s Cherokee County school district has ordered 826 students and 42 teachers to quarantine due to possible exposure in the six days schools have been open, The Atlanta Journal Constitution reported.Of the more than 42,000 students in the district, about 25% of them chose to do virtual learning, according to the outlet.One high school in the district has announced that it will close through at least Aug. 30 following 14 confirmed cases. Remote learning for those students will begin Thursday.Cherokee district staff must wear masks but students do not, the outlet said.Cherokee County is about 40 miles north of Atlanta.11:45 a.m.: Florida sees new record daily death tollHard-hit Florida reached a new record daily death toll with 276 additional fatalities reported on Monday, according to the state’s Department of Health.The previous high record was 257 deaths reported on July 31.Florida, with more than 542,000 diagnosed coronavirus cases, has the second highest number of cases in the U.S. behind California.At least 8,684 people in Florida have died, according to the state’s Department of Health.11:25 a.m.: Cuomo adds Hawaii, South Dakota, Virgin Islands to travel listHawaii, South Dakota and the Virgin Islands have been added to New York state’s travel advisory list, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday.Alaska, New Mexico, Ohio and Rhode Island have been removed from the list.Those traveling to New York from states on the list must quarantine for two weeks when arriving.A state or territory is added to the list if it has a positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents over a one-week average or a 10% or higher positivity rate over a one-week average.Here are the states and territories currently on New York’s travel advisory list: Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Virgin Islands and Wisconsin.In New York state, once the U.S. epicenter of the pandemic, .86% of those tested on Monday were positive, Cuomo said.10:40 a.m.: UMass cancels football seasonThe University of Massachusetts is canceling its football season, athletic director Ryan Bamford announced Tuesday.“The continuing challenges surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic posed too great of a risk,” he said in a statement.Football players started returning to campus in June. In the last seven weeks, there has been one positive coronavirus test among the more than 600 tests administered to the team, the school said.7:29 a.m.: ‘The point is not to be first with a vaccine,’ Azar saysU.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said “transparent data” from phase three clinical trials is necessary to determine whether a vaccine is actually safe and effective. Azar made the comments during an interview Tuesday on ABC’s Good Morning America, following news that Russia had become the first country in the world to officially register a COVID-19 vaccine and declare it ready for use. Moscow approved the vaccine before completing its final Phase III trial, and no scientific data has been released from the early trials so far. “The point is not to be first with a vaccine; the point is to have a vaccine that is safe and effective for the American people and the people of the world,” Azar said on GMA.The U.S.-led Operation Warp Speed initiative, which the Trump administration introduced in early April, currently has six vaccines in development, including two that are in Phase III trials — the final stage before a vaccine candidate could potentially be authorized for use by the Food and Drug Administration. Azar said he believes the United States “could have FDA-authorized or approved vaccines by December.” “We believe that we are on track towards having tens of millions of doses by December of FDA gold-standard vaccine, and hundreds of millions of doses as we go into the new year,” Azar said. “It will really depend on the speed at which the clinical trials enroll and people are vaccinated and then are exposed to the virus.”6:31 a.m.: New Zealand returns to lockdown after finding local transmissionNew Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Tuesday that the city of Auckland would temporarily return to lockdown, after four new locally-transmitted cases of COVID-19 were identified in a household in the region.New Zealand had gone 102 days without recording any locally-transmitted cases — until now.Auckland will be placed under level three restrictions for three days, starting Wednesday afternoon. The rest of the country will go into level two until midnight on Friday.Residents of Auckland will be asked to stay home where possible, while restaurants, bars and non-essential shops will shutter. Schools across the city will also be closed for those three days and gatherings of over 10 people will be prohibited.“We’re asking people in Auckland to stay home to stop the spread,” Ardern said at a press conference Tuesday. “Act as if you have COVID, and as though people around you have COVID.”5:10 a.m.: Russia becomes first country to approve COVID-19 vaccine, Putin saysRussian President Vladimir Putin announced Tuesday that his country has become the first in the world to grant regulatory approval to a COVID-19 vaccine.Speaking at a meeting with his cabinet ministers on state television, Putin said the vaccine had “passed all the needed checks” and had even been given to one of his daughters. The vaccine will soon be administered to Russian health workers, he said.The vaccine, developed by the state-run Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow, was officially registered and declared ready for use after less than two months of human testing, without completing its final Phase III trial. So far, the drug has been tested on fewer than 100 people and Russia has yet to release any scientific data from those early trials.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Phase III trials must involve a minimum of 3,000 volunteers to be recognized.Dozens of COVID-19 vaccine candidates are being developed by teams of researchers around the world, and several are in final Phase III human trials, according to the latest data from the World Health Organization.3:45 a.m.: US records under 50,000 new cases for second straight dayThere were 49,544 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Monday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.It’s the second consecutive day that the nation has recorded under 50,000 new cases. An additional 525 coronavirus-related deaths were also reported.Sunday’s caseload is well below the record set on July 16, when more than 77,000 new cases were identified in a 24-hour reporting period.A total of 5,094,565 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 163,465 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July.Many states have seen a rise in infections in recent weeks, with some — including Arizona, California and Florida — reporting daily records. However, the nationwide number of new cases and deaths have both decreased in the last week, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News Monday night. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgkali9/iStockBy PIERRE THOMAS, YUN CHOI, JASMINE BROWN and PETE MADDEN, ABC News(NEW YORK) — When Philando Castile, a 32-year-old Black man, was pulled over while driving with his girlfriend and her 4-year-old daughter in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, outside of St. Paul, on the night of July 6, 2016, it was far from his first encounter with the local police.Between 2002 and 2016, Castile was stopped 52 times, according to a complaint later filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, resulting in 86 minor traffic offenses. Although most of the charges were ultimately dismissed, Castile, a school cafeteria supervisor, was assessed a total of $6,588 in fines and fees.In an interview with ABC News, Castile’s uncle Clarence told Chief Justice Correspondent Pierre Thomas that he was not only offended by the stops “because it definitely means he was profiled,” but also concerned for his nephew’s well-being.“Driving while Black and dealing with law enforcement,” Clarence said, “is one of the most serious and deadly encounters that could happen to a person of color these days.”Castile’s final traffic stop turned tragic in less than a minute. Officer Jeronimo Yanez made the decision to pull over Castile because, as he said on the police scanner, he and his girlfriend “just look[ed] like people who were involved in a robbery.” After a brief exchange, in which Castile told Yanez that he had a firearm in the vehicle and Yanez told Castile not to reach for it, Yanez opened fire, hitting Castile five times.Castile died of his wounds at a nearby hospital. Yanez was later acquitted on charges of second-degree manslaughter and dangerous discharge of a firearm, though he was ultimately dismissed from the police department.But for many Black Americans, the killing — and the dozens of encounters that preceded it — was further proof that the criminal justice system disproportionately ensnares and endangers Black drivers.“When you’re driving down a street, and those blue and red cherries come on behind you, you all of a sudden get a tingle, your heart starts to race, even when you know you’ve done nothing,” Clarence said. “It’s just the sheer fear.”An analysis of data collected by local police departments on millions of traffic stops over the last several years, conducted by ABC News in collaboration with ABC-owned stations, shows that Black drivers or pedestrians were more likely to be stopped by police than white drivers or pedestrians in several major U.S. cities, after accounting for the demographics of the cities and counties those police departments serve.The data collected by police departments differ from city to city, but ABC News examined multiple years of data in almost every city. Experts stress that racial disparities alone cannot prove racial bias. Rather, the data analysis simply shows the often vast differences in how often members of a city’s police force interact with Black people compared to white people in the same city.In almost every major city examined, the analysis shows at least some disparity in traffic stops. In some cities, those disparities were significant. In Minneapolis, for example, where George Floyd was killed at the hands of the police officers earlier this year, Black drivers were five times more likely to be stopped by police than white drivers. In Chicago, Black drivers were four times more likely to be stopped. And, in Philadelphia, San Francisco and Los Angeles, Black drivers were about three times more likely to be stopped.In cities where ABC News was able to examine police stops of pedestrians, the disparities were often even higher. In Chicago, Black pedestrians are eight times more likely to be stopped by police than white pedestrians. In New York City, Black pedestrians are eight times more likely to be stopped. And in San Francisco, Black pedestrians are seven times more likely to be stopped.The racial disparities in the data are not limited to the traffic stops themselves. In all nine cities where search conduct data was available, an ABC News analysis found that Black Americans are more likely to be searched during stops than white Americans. And in four out of the six cities where search results data was available — Philadelphia; Chicago; Fresno, California; and San Francisco — Black Americans who were stopped were less likely to be found possessing contraband than white Americans.In only two out of the 12 cities examined by ABC News — Louisville, Kentucky; and Houston — Black drivers were as likely as white drivers to be stopped by the police. But a closer look at the data shows that, even in those cities, Black drivers were subject to more scrutiny than their white counterparts.In Houston, Black drivers were three times as likely as white Americans to be searched after being stopped by police. In Louisville, Black drivers were more likely to be stopped for suspected violations that turned out to not be serious enough to lead officers to issue the driver a citation.According to Joanna Weiss, the cofounder and co-director of the nonprofit advocacy group Fines and Fees Justice Center, the consequences of these racial disparities in traffic stops ripple throughout the criminal justice system. In most states, she said, the failure to pay fines and fees associated with traffic violations can result in the suspensions of driver’s licenses, creating what she called “an impossible choice” for many Americans.“Once their license is suspended, you either stop driving, in which case you can’t access work, you can’t access childcare, you can’t access healthcare, you can’t access any of your basic necessities, or you take the risk and continue to drive,” Weiss told ABC News. “The next time he’s pulled over, now [it is] a misdemeanor charge, because driving on a suspended is a misdemeanor in every jurisdiction. That comes with additional fines and fees. It comes with possible jail time as well. So this is how we take somebody, just on the basis of their poverty, and induct them into the criminal justice system.”Frank Baumgartner, a professor of the political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the coauthor of Suspect Citizens: What 20 Million Tell Us About Policing and Race, said the racial disparities in traffic stops fuel a sense of mistrust among law enforcement and the people they are meant to serve, so he recommended a shift to a less counterproductive policing strategy.“Stop using the traffic code as an excuse to go on a fishing expedition,” Baumgartner said. “Make sure that the roads are safe, but don’t use the traffic code and the vehicle code as an excuse to fight the war on crime because we have to recognize that the vast majority of people who are pulled over, are searched, potentially humiliated, are going to be innocent.”Castile’s uncle Clarence, meanwhile, is seeking a solution of his own. In 2017, he joined the St. Paul Police Reserves.“My whole idea behind it was to work with police officers to learn a little bit more about what they do, learn some of the terminology,” Clarence told ABC News, “and then take that information back to the community and share it with young people, people who have difficulties dealing with cops.”The effort began before his nephew’s death, he said, but took on new urgency in its aftermath.“After Phil was shot and killed, it became even more important then,” he said, “because I wanted them to know that even though this horrible thing had happened to my family, we could still find a way to work together.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgSmoking bans would benefit all involvedOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Smoking bans in pubs and cafés would protect the health of thousands of UKhospitality workers and lead to increased profits for landlords and restaurantowners, an investigation has concluded. The investigation, by the TUC-backed magazine Hazards, analysed 97 studiesconducted in eight countries and found ‘the most rigorous and independent’ onesreported that bans had no negative impact on the profits of pubs, clubs, andeateries. Controversially, it also concluded that all existing studies pointing tonegative impacts on worldwide trade were funded by sources in some way relatedto the tobacco industry. As a result, the TUC and lobby group, Action on Smoking and Health, areurging the Government to take note of independent research, and to ignorestudies funded by the tobacco lobby. Under pressure from the pub and restaurant trade, the Government has so farrejected advice from the Health and Safety Commission for a legally-bindingcode to force employers to ban smoking or take stringent measures to protectworkers from other people’s smoke, preferring a voluntary code instead. Within the UK, the TUC found three independent pieces of research that couldfind no evidence of any negative impact from smoking bans already in existencein pubs and bars. Two other surveys – with unclear funding sources – said bans would be badnews for businesses, with one predicting that pubs would lose around 41 percent of their custom if they were forced to ban smokers. Brendan Barber, TUC general secretary elect, said: “Ministers shouldnot be deterred from acting by the results of misleading surveys promoted byorganisations keen to see bars and restaurants remain unhealthy for workers andcustomers alike.” Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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