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first_img February 16, 2021 Find out more June 1, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders called today on provincial and national authorities to thoroughly investigate the murder on 21 May of photojournalist Dodie Nunez, of the regional newspaper Katapat, which had criticised corruption. It said the killing may have had political motives. Nunez was returning home in Cavite province, south of Manila, when three motorcyclists stopped the bus he was on and shot him dead, wounding another person. News May 3, 2021 Find out more May 25, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Photojournalist on critical newspaper murdered Katapat editor Archie Gadang stood for provincial governor in elections earlier this month, since when the winner, Ireneo Maliksi, has sued him for libel. During the campaign, the paper had accused Maliksi of corruption. Several Filipino journalists have been killed in the wake of elections in revenge for often fierce criticism of local politicians. Roberto Ramos, also of Katapat, was killed by motorcycle gunmen on 20 November 2005. PhilippinesAsia – Pacific Mass international solidarity campaign launched in support of Maria Ressa Philippines: RSF and the #HoldTheLine Coalition welcome reprieve for Maria Ressa, demand all other charges and cases be dropped Receive email alerts Follow the news on Philippines Organisation News PhilippinesAsia – Pacific News RSF_en News to go further Filipina journalist still held although court dismissed case eleven days ago Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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first_imgThe rate of obesity in U.S. adults continues to rise while the rate for youth has leveled off, according to a new report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on November 11, 2015. The new findings show that since 2003, adult obesity has risen from 30% to 38%. Over the same time period, the obesity rate for youth ages 2 to 19 has held steady at around 17%.Although some public health experts found the stable youth obesity rate encouraging, others were disappointed that efforts to improve school lunches and reduce sugary beverage consumption have not made more of an impact. The findings for adults were also disappointing. As recently as last year, experts thought that this rate was starting to decline.“We thought maybe what we’re doing in adults is reaching enough people,” Eric Rimm, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, told STAT. “It clearly is not.”Walter Willett, chairman of the School’s nutrition department, told the New York Times that modest improvements in Americans’ diets, noted in a paper he recently co-authored, were mostly found among higher-income, more educated people.“In general, there’s been a big gap” between rich and poor, Willett said. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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first_imgVermont Business Magazine,Vermont Business Magazine (VBM) has announced the winners of its inaugural Rising Stars Award. The list is comprised of 40 winners under the age of 40. Award recipients were selected by a panel of judges for their commitment to business growth, professional excellence and involvement in their communities.SLIDE SHOW OF WINNERSPHOTOS, BIOS & MORE‘We are thrilled by the response to this initiative to recognize these up-and-coming leaders,’ said VBM Publisher John Boutin. ‘We received many outstanding nominations and the judges had a difficult time getting it down to only 40. Those who believe Vermont is losing its young talent need only look at these incredible individuals. It’s not just about business. It’s also about them making a difference in their communities.’‘I was very impressed with the level of enthusiasm evident within the applications for each nominee,’ said Brigitte Ritchie, Vice President, Community Relations, Citizens Bank.  ‘With over seventy applicants it clearly shows the quality of young talent in Vermont.’ Ritchie served as a judge for Rising Stars Award.Attended by Governor Douglas and Governor-elect Shumlin, VBM honored Vermont’s most accomplished young leaders at the Rising Stars Award dinner on Thursday, November 4. The dinner was held at the Sunset Ballroom at the Comfort Suites on Shelburne Road in South Burlington. The honorees are also be featured in a special insert in the November issue of Vermont Business Magazine. SEE FULL LIST BELOW.‘Based on the success of this first effort and the buzz it’s generated, I’m sure the number of nominees will only grow from across the state in the coming years,’ Boutin said.QUICK FACTS: Of the 40 honorees, there were 20 men and 20 women. There were 21 from Chittenden County, 10 from Washington County, four from Lamoille, three from Caledonia, and one each from Rutland and Windham counties. The average age of the winners is 29.http://events.vermontbiz.com/about-rising-stars/Media Contacts:Nicole L’Huillier Fenton | 802-238-6809 | [email protected](link sends e-mail)John Boutin | Vermont Business Magazine | 802.863.8038 | [email protected](link sends e-mail)2010 HONOREESMichael Adams, Owner, Green Mountain Mustard – Eddies Energy Bars, RichmondKelly Ault, Community Organizer, KIDS ARE PRIORITY ONE COALITION, MiddlesexLee Bouyea, Managing Director, FreshTracks Capital, ShelburneJennifer Butson, Director of Public Affairs, Vermont Ski Areas Association, MontpelierKristin Carlson, Senior Reporter/Anchor, WCAX-TV, South BurlingtonRachel Carter, Principal/Owner, Rachel Carter PR, CharlotteHeather Cruickshank, Vice President – Market Manager, Merchants Bank, BurlingtonRachel Cummings, Founder and Consultant, Armistead Caregiver Services, Armistead Caregiver Services, ShelburneWilliam J. Dodge, Director, Downs Rachlin Martin PLLC, BurlingtonTom Gilbert, Director, Highfields Center for Composting, HardwickMark Hall, Senior Marketing Strategist, New Breed Marketing, WinooskiLaura Hubbell, Program Manager for the CVMC VT Blueprint for Health Integrated Pilot and the CVMC Care Management Department, Central Vermont Medical Center, BerlinTrisha Hunt, Radiation Oncology Manager, Central Vermont Medical Center, BerlinDan Jackson, Vice President of Account Management, Dealer.com, BurlingtonPeter Johnson, Owner, Pete’s Greens, CraftsburyErika Keith, Volunteer Coordinator, Planned Parenthood of Northern New England, WillistonAmy Kirschner, Director VBSR Marketplace, VBSR, BurlingtonHannah Manley, Director of Alumni Relatioins & Development, Lyndon State College, LyndonvilleMeredith Martin Davis, General Manager and Partner, High Mowing Organic Seeds, WolcottPeter McDougall, Attorney, Paul Frank + Collins P.C., BurlingtonMegan McIntosh Frenzen, Assistant Professor, Champlain College, BurlingtonAaron Melville, Attorney, Aaron Melville Attorney at Law, St. JohnsburyOwen Milne, Director of Development, VBSR, BurlingtonKevin O’Hara, Finance Director, Green Mountain Council, BSA, WaterburyAntonia Opitz, Director of Events, Vermont Chamber of Commerce, MontpelierJenna Pugliese, Permits and Planning Manager, Stratton Mountain Resort, Stratton MountainNicole Ravlin, Partner/Co-Founder, PMG Public Relations, BurlingtonCathy Resmer, Associate Publisher/Online Editor, Seven Days, BurlingtonDavid Rubel, Area Business Advisor, Vermont Small Business Development Center, MontpelierEdward Shepard, Vice President of Marketing, Small Dog Electronics, WaitsfieldJoe Sinagra, Executive Officer, Homebuilders and Remodelers Association of VT, WillistonBrett Smith, Partner, Fuse, BurlingtonDan Smith, Strategic Consultant, The Arno Group, LLC, StoweHeidi St. Peter, Assoc. Director of Edmundite Campus Ministry for Community Services, St. Michael’s College, ColchesterKate Stephenson, Executive Director, Yestermorrow Design/Build School, WarrenJoshua Terenzini, Sales Manager, Formula Ford Lincoln Mercury, Inc., RutlandAlexandra Tursi, Senior Public Relations Associate, Kelliher Samets Volk, BurlingtonJake Whitcomb, New Programs and Communications Balladeer, 1% for the Planet, WaitsfieldBob Whittaker, Dean of Institutional Advancement, Lyndon State College, LyndonvilleKevin Worden, P.E., Vice President, Engineering Ventures, PC, BurlingtonSource: South Burlington’October 4, 2010’Vermont Business Magazinelast_img read more

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first_img20 Norseman Crt, Paradise Waters is bang on trend for 2018. It’s on the market.DRAMATIC shades, “curvy” furniture — and Hamptons-style is here to stay. You heard it here first — these are among the hottest interior trends to hit the Gold Coast this year, according to local interior stylist, Vanessa Wood. 8 Mackay Close, Bundall offers coastal Hamptons cool. It’s set to go to auction. The kitchen at 20 Norseman Crt, Paradise Waters nails the dark trend. More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach Northless than 1 hour ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa20 hours agoA French fireplace and picture windows finish it off.“Due to our coastal location and slight obsession with the “Hamptons” style, this preferred look will undoubtedly maintain its popularity for some time to come,” said Ms Wood.“Together with the use of weatherboard cladding and grey and white palettes on the exterior of homes, the Gold Coast will watch this architectural preference continue.” 2 Colchester Court, Maudsland is Hamptons-style on a grand scale. “Curvaceous” sofas are one of the next big things. A flower arrangement offers a pop of colour.“Not to mention, they must be one of the easiest flowers to arrange successfully!” said Ms Wood.“Faux plants by the way, are becoming more and more favoured andacceptable.” How to freshen up your abode: — Introduce the ultraviolet shade with a bold wall colour, large rug or seating. For a more subtle effect, a deep purple glass bowl, vase, art work or cushion will do just the trick.— If you like to stay on trend, it’s still possible to infuse the ultra violet colour in a Hamptons home — just be sure to use more restraint.— When it comes to selling, first impressions count. Fresh paint, neat and trimmed gardens, a welcoming scented candle and fresh flowers are so important (Then there’s the obvious declutter, put away the dirty clothes basket, tidy up the toys and freshen the bathrooms). 2 Colchester Court, Maudsland is on the market for $1.8 — $2 million.center_img The on-trend kitchen of 2a Cypress Drive, Broadbeach Waters on the market for $2.5 million.But Ms Wood said the popular white and marble kitchens favoured in Hamptons homes will be eschewed for a darker option.“In fact, black is the new white and we may see the introduction of more black being chosen, in terms of cabinetry and even being used as a wall colour option,” she said.Chunky profiles on bench tops will also become sleeker and more understated, and feature black to brown tones or contrasting marble. The shade can be introduced subtly with art work.When it comes to the finer details, flowers and furniture are tipped to take centre stage. When it comes to furniture, Ms Wood said a trend already emerging and now set totake centre stage, is the use of lower profile, plumper and “curvaceous” sofas andfeature chairs. 20 Norseman Crt, Paradise Waters features open plan Hamptons-style.“The Pantone colour of the year has now been announced — ultra violet,” said Ms Wood.“It’s a significant contrast to the pastels and pinks we’ve worked with in more recent times.” Those “pretty” tones will remain popular for a while, along with sage green and corals. Continuing its popularity is the blue and white Hamptons-style residences, from grand waterfront homes to renovated beach cottages. Dark kitchen shades are tipped to be big this year. Velvet and suede will be popular fabrics.“These will feature in all manner of fabrics but velvet and suede are certainly thefabric choices that will be seen more in 2018,” she said. To cap it off, hydrageneas — either fresh or fake — will be the popular petal of choice to introduce purple hues, sought-after for their array of colour choices and abundant and elegant vibe. Ultra violet is in for 2018.last_img read more

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first_imgSupporters of USC Forward, an organization that aims to change the University’s spending policies, gathered outside Bovard Auditorium on Friday to protest rising tuition costs, low faculty wages, high executive salaries and the University’s impact on the surrounding community. The demonstration included students, faculty and representatives from community organizations such as the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment, faculty of USC Forward, the Clean Carwash Campaign, the Communications Workers of America, the Service Employees International Union and the Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation.More than 50 demonstrators circled Bovard, chanting slogans such as “put people over profit,” before gathering outside the office of President C. L. Max Nikias to deliver a letter explaining the organization’s demands. A spokesperson from the president’s office assured protestors that Nikias would receive the letter.According to its website, USC Forward is “a coalition of students, faculty, alumni and community fighting for a better USC.” The organization’s goals are to increase transparency and to direct funding back towards students, faculty and the local community and away from executive compensation.Maria Rodriguez, a member of SCALE and a student organizer of the demonstration, explained that one of the core issues USC Forward is trying to address is the amount of money that the University spends on management and administrative costs.“We are asking the administration to really consider where the tuition dollars that we are spending [are] going,” Rodriguez said, citing this year’s nearly $2,000 tuition hike. “We’re holding them accountable, and we need them to know that students here, faculty members, community members, religious leaders, want to know where that money is going, because it’s not going into the hands of the faculty members that teach here.”Event organizers set up Halloween-themed booths and handed out bright flyers to passersby; signs listed the difference between executive and faculty salaries, ending with the question, “WTF are we paying for?” According to USC Forward, administrative staffing has increased 306 percent since 1987, and the president receives an annual salary of $1,942,935.Faculty members involved in the demonstration focused on the low salaries and lack of job security that they face while working at USC. According to Andrea Parra, an associate professor in the department of Spanish and Portuguese, non-tenure-track faculty have to take on increasing amounts of administrative tasks, which leaves them working greater hours without significant pay increases. Parra, who has worked at USC since 1999, believes that these working conditions could ultimately impact USC students if these issues are not addressed.“Living in Los Angeles is quite expensive, and trying to make ends meet on USC’s starting salary is quite difficult,” Parra said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “At one time, faculty often taught at other colleges to supplement their incomes, but then the University prohibited teaching elsewhere altogether, leaving contingent faculty between a rock and a hard place.”Members of ACCE, meanwhile, addressed the impact that University activities, such as the building of the University Village, have on the surrounding community. Martha Sanchez, a member of ACCE who spoke at the demonstration, said the construction and other USC land purchases have forced out community residents, while the University’s lack of hiring in the area has left the neighborhood with a dearth of jobs.“For the last 16 years I have witnessed how this institution has been eating away at community businesses, affordable housing, and many other retail stores that used to serve people living in this community,” Sanchez said. “USC has built walls and placed guards on every street corner. We are outsiders to this campus.”Nikias did not respond to requests for comment.last_img read more